UC SAN DIEGO NEWS RELEASES

October 7, 2016

Media Contact: Doug Ramsey, 858-822-5825, dramsey@ucsd.edu
Program Contact: Trish Stone, 858-822-5307, tstone@ucsd.edu

Performance Series at UC San Diego Qualcomm Institute Enters Fourth Season

The 2016-2017 season of the Qualcomm Institute’s primary performance series gets underway on October 20. The performances and artist residencies were awarded by the Initiative for Digital Exploration of Arts and Sciences (IDEAS) following a peer-review competition open to faculty and graduate students in Music, Theatre and Dance and Visual Arts, as well as any engineering discipline. The IDEAS program is now entering its fourth season.

"I am extremely proud and excited to witness IDEAS enter its fourth year with such a strong and innovative line-up of pieces," said Shahrokh Yadegari, a professor of Music at UC San Diego and chair of the IDEAS selection committee. “This year’s programs will bring faculty, students and researchers the performative and presentational context for interdisciplinary artistic and scientific endeavors taking advantage of the state-of-the-art technologies available at Qualcomm Institute." (All of the performances will take place in the Calit2 Theater except for “STILL” in the Calit2 Auditorium, both in Atkinson Hall.)

Thursday, October 20, 2016, 5pm-7pm
Measuring the Dream
Victoria Petrovich, Yolande Snaith, and Ryan Welsh

Measuring the Dream is a multimedia dance collaboration that draws on "The Dream", by Sister Juana Inez De La Cruz. The collaborative team includes Yolande Snaith, Victoria Petrovich, Ryan Welsh, Jose Lopez, Erin Tracy, Aurora Lagattuta, Heather Glabe, Veronica Santiago Moniello and Anne Gehman.

The production is based on text, choreography, music and the visual world from the tragic life of Sor Juana Inez De La Cruz and her written works, in particular The Dream. "The poetic landscape of images, emotions and the feminine philosophy that her work expresses provide a rich, universal and timeless theme for this multimedia production," said production designer Petrovich, who has previously been involved in Qualcomm Institute performances (including Prof. Mark Dresser’s Telematic concerts, Crossing Boundaries with Shahrokh Yadegari, and the opera workshop for Lilith with Anthony Davis and Allan Havis, which was part of the IDEAS series). "This project will be a multidimensional synthesis of visual imagery, sound, text and choreography," notes choreographer Snaith. "The collaborative team aims to create a poetic synthesis between our respective disciplines through the integration of dance, music, text, voice and visual design, in order to merge the essence of Sor Juana’s unique, historic voice with the invention of a new, highly contemporary artistic language using the new technologies at the Qualcomm Institute." Composer Ryan Welsh is working on his Ph.D. in music (composition) at UC San Diego. "In contrast to the rambling and ever-unfolding nature of the text by Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, the musical score will emphasize the spoken text as a unified sonic object, alongside other processed and manipulated vocal sounds," explains Welsh. "The Qualcomm Institute's black-box Theater provides the opportunity to surround the audience in an immersive and evolving sonic landscape. The audience will travel into the imaginative writings of Sor Juana through the narrow and claustrophobia-inducing cloisters of her native Mexican convent and arrive at the expansive universe of the sister’s mind."

Thursday, November 17, 2016, 5pm-7pm
The Pawel Norway Dream Machine
Gabi Schaffzin, Sofie Hodara, and Zachary Kaiser

In the second performance of the IDEAS season, a team of three artists, researchers and technologists will present a hybrid performance-exhibition featuring modern-day efforts to recreate experiments dating back to 1841 on Dr. Pawel Norway's treatise on Computable Transformation of Human Qualities to Those of a Visible Dream Memory. The 1841 treatise is an obscure but intriguing thesis on the possibility of inferring dream content from the behavior of a subject after he or she has awakened. The scientist believed that this energy can be collected and measured, including its velocity coming off the body, temperature, etc., which could make it possible to reconstruct the prior dreams.

Gabi Schaffzin, a second-year Ph.D. student of Art Practice in Visual Arts, says the work draws parallels between Norway’s thesis and today’s quantitative health movement: "Both seek to infer a macro-level understanding of a body by measuring its micro-qualities." For the performance-exhibition, the artists have recreated Norway's experiments to bring dream visualizations to the public. "We have developed the apparatus of Pawel Norway's fantasies,” explained artist Sofie Hodara, a designer and educator. “It reads what our bodies say about our dreams (extracting from that data imagery, narrative content, and subconscious meaning) once we are awake through high-sensitivity motion sensors, EEG readers, as well as temperature, and audio sensors." The output that makes up the bulk of the exhibition borrows from the quasi-representational nature of Dr. Norway's lithographs and incorporates imagery and visuals produced and shared by the large swath of humanity living its lives on social-media outlets. "The result is an algorithmically generated multimedia tapestry dynamically informed by the sensorial inputs we've combined," adds Zachary Kaiser, a professor of Graphic Design and Experience Architecture at Michigan State University. "We are now ready to present our findings alongside Dr. Norway's in a hybrid performance-exhibition installation in the Qualcomm Institute which will feature live dream-readings of volunteer visitors as well as Dr. Norway's work, with all the visuals on the Vroom display wall in the Calit2 Theater using the MUGIC system that has already been used for other IDEAS performances."

Thursday, January 12, 2017, 5pm-7pm
MACHINAL
Will Detlefsen, Mary Glen Fredrick, Grady Kestler, Annie Le, Steven Leffue, Anna Robinson, Brandon Rosen, Kristen Tregar, Enrico Nassi, and Stephanie Del Rosso

MACHINAL will be the third performance of the IDEAS season. The work is an artistic experiment that asks questions about what live theatre can be and how technology and machines have changed the landscape of our human interactions in the world today. Based on the real-life case of Ruth Snyder, this devised performance is the story of a woman caged in a male-dominated, mechanized, materialistic world who murders her husband in order to be set free. The performance used the Vroom wall display system in the Calit2 Theater for a live performance and interaction with a live audience. “Machinal is an artistic experiment based on big questions about what live theatre can be and how technology and machines have changed the landscape of our human interactions in the world today,” said Will Detlefsen, an MFA candidate in Directing (expected in 2017) and one of the graduate students behind MACHINAL. The performance is based, in part, on the 1928 play Machinal by Sophie Treadwell, based on the true story of the first woman sentenced to the electric chair for murdering her husband. Performer/sonic Interactions in Machinal will feature EEG driven sound sources developed by Italian computer musician Franceso Roberto Dani.

Thursday, March 23, 2017, 5pm-7pm
The Burden of Selfhood
Stefani Byrd, Sarah Ciston, Amy Fox, and Fernanda Navarro

The Burden of Selfhood is an interdisciplinary work exploring the intersection of feminism, identity and technology. By using interactive technology and research from cognitive science, music, poetry, video and performance art, the performance will investigate the experience of viewing and being viewed as a gendered body. “Technology has accelerated the recursive gaze to the point that we continually perform and project back onto each other our internalized expectations for unattainable perfection,” said artist Stefani Byrd, an MFA candidate in Visual Arts. “This poly-vocal performance will use large-scale data visualizations and live performers to make explicit both the collective gaze and the implicit impact of being seen.” Using gaze-tracking technology, the first part of the live performance will implicate the view of the audience by revealing where their attention is focused on the body of the performer as the piece unfolds. This data will be used to create a “heat map” that is then projected onto the performer’s body. In Act Two, the artists use projection mapping to project alternative faces onto the performer’s face, turning it into a “malleable surface that we can transform to visualize ideas around reconstructing identity,” said Sara Ciston, MFA candidate in Writing at UC San Diego. Other participants include Cognitive Science Ph.D. student Amy Rae Fox, and composer Fernanda Navarro, a Ph.D. student in the Music department. Fox conducted language-based content analysis of user-generated makeup tutorial videos as a prelude to projecting new faces on the performer.

Thursday, April 20, 2017
STILL
Kyle Johnson

The multimedia artist and documentary filmmaker behind STILL is in the Music Composition Ph.D. program at UC San Diego, where he earned his M.A. in Music. The work focuses on the ideas of fiction, devotion, intimacy and skepticism. Combining elements of music, theatre, cinema and poetry. In it, a single performer stands between video displays and stereo loudspeakers, delivering a stylized speech-song accompanied by recorded and synthesized sounds. The performer also interacts with composite videos shown on the video displays. Uniquely, Johnson pre-records 4K video, which is four times the resolution of HD video, giving him the “editing freedom to crop the image to any aspect ratio at any time without any jarring loss of quality.”

Thursday, May 25, 2017, 5pm-7pm
Song Cycle for Security Camera
Joe Cantrell, Nicolee Kuester

While the convenience and utility of mobile communication and more recently the so-called Internet of Things keeps us connected and fluid, it simultaneously alters the understanding of public and private spaces in ways that were not intended. The mobile browser and map applications that have become crucial parts of our increased functionality are also collecting data about our whereabouts and activities, often without our knowledge or full consent. Song Cycle for Security Camera is a generated song cycle that explores the multi-layered meanings that surround contemporary technological use through a visual and aural examination of text, code and voice, according to musician and multimedia artist Joe Cantrell. Video feeds from unsecured live remote camera locations across the world are interpolated and reprocessed as visual matrices of standard ASCII text and displayed in real time, filling the entirety of the high-resolution Vroom video display wall and generating immersive audio. “The piece works through a series of three activating areas,” said the Ph.D. candidate in integrative studies at UC San Diego. “These include remote computer vision, textualized (mis)interpretation of this vision, and instantiation of the processed signal.” As the ASCII letters are processed, the system watches for specific words that spell out items from sourced texts related to the nature of the video projected ­ end user license agreements, children’s songs, etc. Each time a word is recognized, it is intoned via speech synthesis in manner that simulates singing. Multiple words will be layered on one another to create a chorus­like effect. When 20 words are found that relate to a specific video stream, the live streaming will fade out and each word will fill the screen as the system sings to the audience. The video source is then changed to another location and the process begins again. The piece ends when four 'songs' have been performed. “Song Cycle for Security Camera will be an immersive aural and visual performance that is overwhelming in its scope but accessible as a gestalt event,” added Cantrell. “By experiencing a plurality of aesthetic contexts, the audience will be confronted with the sublime and complicated meanings associated with technological development.” The IDEAS program was launched in 2013 to encourage artists, technologists and scientists to take advantage of the Qualcomm Institute’s advanced audio-visual facilities, services and personnel in developing and staging new or existing works.

January 8, 2016

Media Contact: Doug Ramsey, 858-822-5825, dramsey@ucsd.edu
Program Contact: Trish Stone, 858-822-5307, tstone@ucsd.edu

Invitation to UC San Diego Faculty, Students for Digitally-Mediated Performance Events; February 15 Deadline for Proposals

San Diego, January 8, 2016 — The Qualcomm Institute at the University of California, San Diego has launched fourth annual invitation to faculty and students to propose the performance of works in visual arts, music as well as theatre and dance. The winning events will be staged in the institute’s high-tech venues in Atkinson Hall on the UC San Diego campus.

The Call for Events was published online today, with all proposals to be submitted no later than the deadline of noon Pacific time on Monday, February 15, 2016. The competition will result in the selection of works for residencies and performances during the 2016-‘17 season of the Qualcomm Institute (QI) Initiative for Digital Exploration of Arts and Sciences (IDEAS).

The IDEAS program was launched in 2013 to encourage all artists and technologists to take advantage of the Qualcomm Institute’s advanced audio-visual facilities, services and personnel in staging new or existing works. “In the past three years, the IDEAS program has provided support for the staging of two dozen performances in the institute, many of them original works that took advantage of QI’s unique audio-visual technologies and interactive performance spaces,” said composer Shahrokh Yadegari, a professor of Theatre and Dance who directs the IDEAS program.

In addition to the Call for Events, IDEAS is inviting interested faculty, students and alumni to attend an IDEAS Proposal Workshop from 5-7pm on Thursday, January 28, 2016. During the workshop, potential proposers will be given a tour and see demos of the various performance spaces.

For the complete Call for Events and instructions on how to submit a winning proposal, click here.

June 15, 2015

Media Contact: Doug Ramsey, 858-822-5825, dramsey@ucsd.edu
Program Contact: Trish Stone, 858-822-5307, tstone@ucsd.edu

Nine works in 2015-'16 IDEAS season of performances - Launches June 15!

On June 15, the Qualcomm Institute will kick off its new season of nine works involving residencies and performances funded by the institute's Initiative for Digital Exploration of Arts and Sciences (IDEAS). The interdisciplinary work, titled CrowdCAVE, will use two of the Qualcomm Institute's key visualization spaces: the StarCAVE virtual-reality environment, where small groups of visitors are surrounded by a virtual crowd to which they are added; and the large-scale Vroom display wall next door in the Calit2 Theater, which will showcase the full breadth of the virtual group portraiture. "By using the Vroom display wall," says UC San Diego visual arts lecturer Emily Grenader (MFA '13), "we will be able to adequately show the ties between individuals at different locations performing in different ways."

Grenader's CrowdCAVE is one of three works by visual arts faculty or students; the others are Angela Washko's Entering the Echo Chamber and Amy Alexander's Rocket's Red Glare. Five works are primarily by composers and sound designers from the Department of Music, and one performance features a team of first-year MFA students from Theatre and Dance (although Theatre and Dance professors and students are participating as collaborators in a number of projects). In addition to the Qualcomm Institute, the IDEAS series is supported by the Office of the Dean of Graduate Division.

The selection committee, which was composed of 11 faculty members, had a difficult time in choosing among the 28 submitted proposals due to the exceptional quality of the ideas and projects proposed. "We are very excited that the projects this year are more diverse in their interdisciplinary nature," said IDEAS director Shahrokh Yadegari, a professor in Theatre and Dance. "The proposals were also more adept and strategic in taking advantage of the state-of-the-art technologies available to them at the Qualcomm Institute."

November 5, 2014

Media Contact: Doug Ramsey, 858-822-5825, dramsey@ucsd.edu
Program Contact: Trish Stone, 858-822-5307, tstone@ucsd.edu

Third Call for Proposals for Digitally-Mediated Performances at UC San Diego

December 3 Deadline for Proposals in Visual Arts, Music, Theatre & Dance

The Qualcomm Institute is inviting University of California, San Diego-affiliated musicians, video artists, composers, engineers, and scientists to submit interdisciplinary event proposals to develop and/or stage their works and research in the institute’s high-tech venues.

The new round of proposals will lead to the selection of works and research for the 2015 season of the institute’s Initiative for Digital Exploration of Arts and Sciences (IDEAS), with as many as a dozen residencies, presentations and performances to take place between January and November 2015.

“It was exciting to see how the Qualcomm Institute’s theaters and labs came to life as the winners of the 2014 IDEAS grants created and staged works at the intersection of the arts and technology,” said Shahrokh Yadegari, Director of IDEAS and a composer who is a professor of theatre and dance at UC San Diego. “All of the performances were in some way technology-enabled or enhanced by the audio-visual capabilities available to the artists, and we are looking forward to the 2015 season as an opportunity to accelerate the engagement and interdisciplinary collaborations among UC San Diego’s cutting-edge artists in the performing arts together with the scientists and engineers at the university.”

The latest Call for Events sets noon Pacific time on Wednesday, December 3, 2014, as the deadline for submissions by UC San Diego faculty, staff, students, alumni or other affiliates who want to stage performances that are in some way digitally-mediated or enhanced.

The IDEAS initiative was launched in 2013 to encourage all types of artists and technologists to take advantage of the Qualcomm Institute’s advanced audio-visual facilities, services and personnel in staging new or existing works in its headquarters building, Atkinson Hall, at UC San Diego.

“The institute offers spaces and tools that can provide faculty interested in interdisciplinary research with a new canvas for their technology-related performances and research on the intersection of arts and technology,” said Qualcomm Institute director Ramesh Rao. “In the past two years, winners of the IDEAS grants surprised and delighted audiences by ingeniously staging their works using advanced technologies, such as spatialized audio, large-scale video walls, and immersive 3D virtual-reality environments.”

The latest Call for Events seeks submissions for in-kind support from the Qualcomm Institute for performances or other arts-based events to be staged in or around Atkinson Hall between January 1 and November 30, 2015. Proposals must be submitted no later than noon Pacific time on Wednesday, December 3, 2014.

IDEAS submissions go through a rigorous, peer-review process, resulting in decisions to be announced in early December 2014. The IDEAS Program Committee, appointed by Rao and Yadegari, includes affiliated technology researchers as well as UCSD faculty from the departments of Music, Visual Arts, and Theatre & Dance. “Peer review is an important part of this process,” said Yadegari, “because we want the works to be experimental, exploratory, technological and of strong academic merit.”

The IDEAS awards will support onsite residencies lasting from a single day to a full week, depending on project scope. It is anticipated that the longer residencies will feature new works, while the one-day awards would go to re-staging of a previously performed work.

Preference will be given to multidisciplinary submissions, as well as the artist’s ability to take maximum advantage of the Qualcomm Institute’s unique combination of visual and audio technologies, as well as its internal and external spaces for performances. These include: the 200-seat Calit2 Auditorium, which is equipped with a 12.1 Meyer surround sound system and 4K projection (offering four times the resolution of HD-TV); the 100-seat Calit2 Theater (a “black box” space with a large Vroom display wall and reconfigurable seating); the Performative Computing Lab (for advanced motion capture to integrate the human body into digital space); as well as internal and external public spaces that range from the courtyard surrounding the 185-ton granite “Bear” statue in front of Atkinson Hall, to its Zen-like rock garden in back.

2014 Season Finale

The final performance of the 2014 IDEAS season is slated for Thursday, November 6 at 5pm in the Calit2 Theater. Titled “Tacoma Narrows Monochord,” the percussion-based theater and media performance composed and performed by UC San Diego alumna Aiyun Huang (DMA ’02) instrumentalizes archival footage and historical narratives related to the Puget Sound in Washington State. The multi-movement “pocket media-opera” features 20 video, sound and movement interactions, including footage of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapse. After the performance, audience members are welcome to try to prevent the bridge collapse by interacting with the gaming element of the piece. The performance in the Calit2 Theater will take place on the final day of the team's five-day residency in the Qualcomm Institute.

The Call for Events and additional information are available on the IDEAS website at http://ideas.ucsd.edu. Proposals must be submitted online through the Online Submission Form, including a PDF no longer than three pages (including images). They will be judged on the quality of the submission, the proposed impact of the critical engagement, the extent to which the work best uses the Qualcomm Institute’s unique spaces and audio-visual technologies, the multidisciplinary nature of the proposed work, and its relevance in advancing IDEAS’ central mission of digital exploration at the intersection of arts and sciences.

All proposals must be submitted online no later than noon Pacific time on Wednesday, November 26, 2014. For questions about the program, contact the program manager, Trish Stone, at tstone@ucsd.edu.

Related Links

Initiative for Digital Exploration of Arts and Sciences - http://ideas.ucsd.edu

December 19, 2013

Media Contact: Doug Ramsey, 858-822-5825, dramsey@ucsd.edu
Program Contact: Trish Stone, 858-822-5307, tstone@ucsd.edu

Qualcomm Institute at UC San Diego Sets Second Season for IDEAS in Performance

Nine Works in 2014 Season of Initiative for Digital Exploration of Arts and Sciences

The 2014 season of performances at the University of California, San Diego under the Initiative for Digital Exploration of Arts and Sciences (IDEAS) will kick off on February 20, 2014 with TELL THEM EVERYTHING / REMEMBER US (T2ERU), a multimedia presentation and live performance. The media content will include panoramic images, videos, sound works and data-driven visualizations derived from community input. The performance – the first of eight in the 2014 season – will be tailored for the wall-sized VROOM display system of the Calit2 Theater in Atkinson Hall, home of the Qualcomm Institute, the UC San Diego division of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2).

Visual Arts professor Michael Trigilio is working with student-artists and ongoing collaborators (including Trish Stone from the Qualcomm Institute and fabricator Xander Sligh), and the contents for the hour-long presentation will be pulled from T2ERU, an ongoing multi-platform media suite initially designed for the unique visualization resources of the Qualcomm Institute. “Students are learning to research new-media techniques,” explained Trigilio, “while they are investigating the broader conceptual terrain of memory and conceptual archaeology as a conduit to developing works for inclusion in the broad set of T2ERU materials.”

The Qualcomm Institute established IDEAS to encourage artists and technologists to take advantage of its advanced audio-visual facilities, services and personnel to stage new or existing works. Following a successful first season in 2013, organizers invited a new round of proposals. Following an extensive peer review of 19 final proposals, the initiative’s selection committee awarded residencies to the artists and musicians behind the nine works to be staged between February and November.

“I am very excited about this year’s IDEAS performance series,” said IDEAS director Shahrokh Yadegari, an Associate Professor of Composition and Sound Design in UCSD’s Department of Theatre and Dance. “The selection committee had the difficult task of having to choose from a list of many qualified applications. This is a testament to the interest and commitment of the UCSD art community to experimental and technological approaches.”

Another 2014 performance will reimagine Euripides’ Medea as a post-World War II diary of a suburban housewife. The play, Radiance (a witch hunt), by UCSD MFA Playwriting candidate Kristin Idaszak, traces the life of Maddie, the daughter of a German nuclear physicist, who marries an American officer and ends up feeling like a Cold War prisoner in suburbia. According to its author, “the play investigates the Medea myth and witch hunts from the ancient past to the present day.” Radiance draws on such varied source material as Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique, the confessional poetry of Anne Sexton and Sylvia Plath, MacBeth, and the recent bestseller, “Lean In”, by Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg. The play will be directed by MFA-Directing candidate Sarah Wansley, and it will feature a vocal soundtrack by Bonnie Lander. The creative team will work with MFA actors as well as projection, sound and lighting designers over a five-day residency in the Qualcomm Institute, culminating in a public staged reading with sound and video effects on June 14, 2014.

While Medea is reimagined, another ancient story is re-told by writer, director and MFA candidate Elmira Mohebali. She will present video and the story, Epic of Gilgamesh: A Tale of Love and Revenge. Mohebali will explore the interaction between two characters from what is believed to be the oldest literary text in human history, the Epic of Gilgamesh, dating to the first Ancient Mesopotamian civilization around 2200BC.

Most of the works to be mounted during the 2014 season will take advantage of the unique facilities available in Atkinson Hall. Notes IDEAS director Yadegari: “The Qualcomm Institute provides unique, state-of-the-art facilities and support staff for advanced, interdisciplinary project development and presentation, bringing together the arts and science communities of UC San Diego.”

Sam Doshier’s “Sampling for Your Soul” was created specifically to be performed in the Calit2 Auditorium, taking advantage of its ultra-high-definition, 4K video projector and Meyer 7.1 surround sound system. The two performers on stage will showcase video and audio samples, but rather than having one VJ and one DJ, UCSD Interdisciplinary Computing and the Arts alumnus Doshier (BA ’12) and fellow performer David Lopez Arenosa (BA ’13) will each control both video and audio sampling simultaneously.

Full immersion is one of the themes running through multiple works on the program. “Soldier,” an immersive cinema piece by UCSD sound artist and graduate student Yvette Jackson (Ph.D. ‘16) and visual artist Ava Porter (MFA ’15), will move into the Calit2 Recombinant Media Lab and beam images of warfare and popular culture onto all of its walls. The installation will remain open to visitors through its five-day run, with each day depicting a different battle. On the audio side, Samuel Dunscombe’s “Cartography Event” is billed as an “immersive sound performance” that also includes a telematic component linking performers in real time between San Diego and Tokyo.

Another work featuring a telematic component is “HYDRA: A New Model of Live Processing and Real-Time Distributed Creativity.” Organized by Chris Golinski, a UCSD Ph.D. student in Music, “HYDRA” will involve live music transmitted between Atkinson Hall and the Manhattan School of Music, but even within Atkinson Hall, the performers will not share the same physical space. “A major limitation in processing live acoustic instruments is the unavoidable audibility of the instrument being processed,” said Golinski. “HYDRA turns the typical paradigm of live processing on its head by completely isolating the acoustic musicians through the use of telematic technology.” Each instrumentalist will be in a different, acoustically-isolated space, with audio and video sent between spaces via Ethernet. The sound from each space will then be processed live by “laptop improvisers” at the two audience locations. The technical director for “HYDRA” is Hong Kong-born composer Yeung-ping Chen, a graduate student in music composition under UCSD Music professor Lei Liang, the Qualcomm Institute’s Composer in Residence.

Two other UCSD Ph.D. students in Music are organizing the premiere performance by a an interdisciplinary UCSD-Harvard performance group of musicians, writers and artists jointly called Ensemble Exchange. Jon Forshee and Jonathan Hepfer are completing their doctorates in composition and conducting, respectively. The IDEAS concert “IMAGE l TEXT l MUSIC” will include two works that “make exceptional use of digital video and projection as an integral element of the acoustic musical performance,” said Forshee. One of those pieces, American Engineer by Daniel Iglesia, was written for flute, clarinet, violin, viola, cello, electronic percussion – and live video for 3D glasses.

Finishing out the 2014 IDEAS season will be noted UC San Diego alumna, Aiyun Huang (Ph.D., Music ’02), with her new percussion-and-media work, “Tacoma Narrows Monochord.” The multi-movement piece features seven video, sound and movement interactions that serve to ‘instrumentalize’ archival footage and historical research related to the collapse in 1940 of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge in Washington State’s Puget Sound. The video pairs footage of the collapse with motion-captured 3D images of hands mimicking the event, ultimately creating a metaphor for the collapse of 20th–century civil labor law in the Puget Sound region. Based on timbre shifts in Huang’s highly-refined finger percussion techniques, the work stages a series of competition-style rounds where shifts in musical behaviors of the percussionist's fingers can prevent or delay the collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge in the video. Huang, who is now a professor at McGill University in Montreal, was the First Prize and Audience Award winner at the Geneva International Music Competition in 2002. Joining her for the performance are fellow UCSD Music alumnus Sean Griffin (Ph.D. in Composition ‘03) and John Iversen, a cognitive neuroscientist studying music and the brain, who is a project scientist in the Institute for Neural Computation and the Swartz Center for Computational Neurosciences, both at UC San Diego.

April 23, 2013

Media Contact: Doug Ramsey, 858-822-5825, dramsey@ucsd.edu
Program Contact: Trish Stone, 858-822-5307, tstone@ucsd.edu

Second Call for Proposals for Digitally-Mediated Performances in Calit2’s Qualcomm Institute

August 15 Deadline for Proposals from University of California affiliates

The Qualcomm Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, the UC San Diego division of Calit2, has launched the second round of its new series for technology-enabled or enhanced performances at the intersection of technology and the arts.

The latest Call for Events sets August 15, 2013, as the deadline for submissions by all University of California affiliates who want to stage performances on the cutting edge of digitally-mediated or enhanced music, visual arts, theatre and/or dance.

Last April Calit2 launched the Initiative for Digital Exploration of Arts and Sciences (IDEAS). The initiative aims to encourage all types of artists and technologists to take advantage of Calit2’s advanced audio-visual facilities, services and personnel in staging new or existing works in its headquarters building at UC San Diego, Atkinson Hall.

According to IDEAS director Shahrokh Yadegari, a professor of theatre and dance at UC San Diego and long-time academic participant in Calit2, “Calit2 offers spaces and tools – from advanced spatialized audio to large-scale video walls and immersive, 3D virtual-reality environments – that can provide arts faculty with a new canvas for their technology-based performances.”

The second Call for Proposals seeks submissions for in-kind support from Calit2 for performances or other artistic events to be staged in or around Atkinson Hall between September 1 and June 30, 2014. Proposals must be submitted no later than noon Pacific time on Thursday, August 15.

IDEAS submissions go through a rigorous, peer-review process, resulting in decisions to be announced in September. The Program Committee, appointed by Qualcomm Director Ramesh Rao, includes affiliated technology researchers as well as UCSD faculty from the departments of Music, Visual Arts, and Theatre & Dance. Said Rao: “Peer review is an important part of this process, because we want faculty and graduate students to propose performances that are experimental, exploratory, technological and of strong academic merit.”

The IDEAS awards will support onsite residencies lasting from a single day to a full week, depending on project scope. It is anticipated that the longer residencies will feature new works, while the one-day awards may involve re-staging of a previously performed work.

Preference will be given to multidisciplinary submissions from individuals or groups who would make the best use of Calit2’s unique combination of visual and audio technologies, and with its internal and external spaces for performances. These include: the 200-seat Calit2 Auditorium, which is equipped with a 12.1 Meyer surround sound system and 4K projection (offering four times the resolution of HD-TV); the 100-seat Calit2 Theater (a “black box” space with a large Vroom display wall and reconfigurable seating); the Performative Computing Lab (for advanced motion capture to integrate the human body into digital space); as well as internal and external public spaces that range from the courtyard surrounding the 185-ton granite “Bear” statue in front of Atkinson Hall, to its Zen-like rock garden in back.

IDEAS recently staged the first performance in the series. On April 20, former Calit2 Composer in Residence Roger Reynolds introduced his work “Submerged Memories” for voice, violin, bass clarinet, electric guitar, and percussion. Reynolds extracted the texts from the work of the maverick German writer, W.G. Sebald. His slightly surreal texts (especially his novels, The Rings of Saturn and Vertigo) “wander unsettlingly between the quotidian and the vaguely supernatural.” The musicians shadow the narration, acting as a ghostly chorus. Each musician has a set of "target" words or phrases that s/he mimics instrumentally. So what the narrator says, but also how he says it, gives rise to a shadowy, elastic murmur, a peculiar non-verbal echoing of the stories being told. The performance was directed by an idiosyncratic clock that "ticked" once every 28 seconds.

Upcoming events in the IDEAS series include:

  • Saturday, April 27 at 8PM in the Calit2 Theater, Atkinson Hall: “Fractalicious!” written by UC Irvine Prof. Bryan Reynolds. The performance of the Transversal Theater Company combines five powerful components, a coalescing pastiche of characters, subject positions, performance modes, and digital technologies. [details]
  • Friday, May 3, 5PM, in the Calit2 Theater, Atkinson Hall: “Strange Journeys,” by Joshua Tonies. Tonies will lead a colloquium, including a demonstration of his digital panorama utilizing imagery sourced from international handbills. It will include confirmed guests including UCSD Art History Ph.D. Eun Jung Park, and Alexander Jarman of the San Diego Museum of Art.

A complete list of upcoming performances in the inaugural IDEAS round can be found on the IDEAS website at http://ideas.ucsd.edu/performances.php.

Detailed information and rules for submissions are contained in the Call for Proposals, now available on the Initiative for Digital Exploration of Arts and Sciences website at http://ideas.calit2.net. Proposals must be submitted online through the Online Submission form, including a PDF no longer than three pages, including images. They will be judged on the quality of the submission, the proposed impact of the critical engagement, the extent to which the work best uses Calit2’s unique spaces and audio-visual technologies, the multidisciplinary nature of the proposed work, and its relevance in advancing IDEAS’ central mission of digital exploration at the intersection of arts and sciences.

All proposals must be submitted online no later than noon Pacific time on Wednesday, July 31, 2013. For questions about the program, contact the program manager, Trish Stone, at tstone@ucsd.edu.

Related Links

Initiative for Digital Exploration of Arts and Sciences - http://ideas.ucsd.edu
Calit2 - http://www.calit2.net

February 1, 2013

Fresh IDEAS: In-Kind Support and Venue for Digitally-Mediated Performances

+ CLICK FOR MORE

Would you like to receive IDEAS announcements? Please sign up for our mailing list by contacting Trish Stone at tstone@ucsd.edu.